neighbourwoods logo and slogan, "To educate, advocate, and promote a healthy urban forest in Centre Wellington"

Neighbourwoods Policy: COVID 19

The health and safety of Neighbourwoods volunteers is a top concern amid the global COVID-19 pandemic. During this time, we are placing an increased focus on health and safety.

Volunteer activities have been delayed until further notice. In the case that we can resume work, we will require that:

  • Each volunteer travels to worksites in their own vehicle unless they are traveling with a family member. At all times volunteers must maintain social distancing of at least 2 meters and wear gloves. Hand sanitizer will be available
  • For tree planting/stewardship volunteers must use their own equipment. For Citizen Pruning and Tree Inventory, Neighbourwoods will sterilize all tools at the end of each shift. Hand sanitizer will be available.

May 5, 2020

What we're doing

Tree Inventory

DSC_0243Since 2009, Neighbourwoods volunteers have been inventorying the trees in Centre Wellington. We observe 31 different characteristics about each tree, to learn more about the urban forest in our community. To date we have looked at more than 11,000 trees.

Celebration Trees

img_603Celebration Trees is a flagship program of NeighbourWoods, in partnership with CW Parks Department. To date, more than 100 trees have been added to our parks. Thank you to Paul Mitchell and his volunteer committee who manage this popular program.

Citizen Pruner

Thanks to a grant from the Canadian Tree Fund, Neighbourwoods is excited to introduce Citizen Pruners. Citizen Pruners aims to prune the urban trees in our community with trained, community volunteers. Pruning is essential for a young tree to grow into adulthood – and we want our trees to live as long as possible.

Public Education

A big part of what we do is advocate and promote understanding of the value and importance of trees in our community, through public education.

Explore this section to learn about our initiatives.

The Bigger The Better!

While large trees take more work to maintain – and give us more leaves to rake – when there is adequate space for them, there is a compelling argument in their favour. Large trees have a bigger impact in every way than small stature trees. Large trees do more to conserve energy, reduce storm water run off, improve local air quality, provide more wildlife habitat, add more beauty to a street, and offer better shade. In parking lots, large trees do a better job mitigating the heat island effect. If you need more convincing you can read more here

Big trees offer shade to both the road and sidewalk, which helps keep the ground cool.
Big trees offer shade to both the road and sidewalk, which helps keep the ground cool.
Small trees do not benefit the neighbourhood nearly as much as large, mature trees do.
Small trees do not benefit the neighbourhood nearly as much as large, mature trees do.

Our Roots

It all began with the sad decline of the norway spruce tree, in front of the Municipal Centre, in Elora. For years it had served as the town’s much-loved Christmas tree, where the community gathered for its ceremonial lighting, hot chocolate and carols.

By 2005, it became clear that a new tree was the only solution and a collective effort to replace it was launched.  Centre Wellington Public Works removed the old tree, the Grand River Conservation Authority donated a healthy new native white spruce and Centre Wellington Hydro funded the cost of spading in our new tree.

Community fanfare and celebration welcomed the tree on Earth Day 2006.

And with it, Neighbourwoods was established as the Urban Forest branch of the Elora Environment Centre.

The old norway spruce in 2005.
The old norway spruce in 2005.
Spading the new white spruce tree into the ground.
Spading the new white spruce tree into the ground.
The white spruce tree - freshly planted.
The white spruce tree – freshly planted.
New white spruce tree in 2016!
New white spruce tree in 2016!
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CONTACT US | 1-888-713-4088 | Neighbourwoods@EloraEnvironmentCentre.ca